Facebook emails say it collected call records, knowing it was 'high-risk'

Facebook emails say it collected call records, knowing it was 'high-risk'

Facebook emails say it collected call records, knowing it was 'high-risk'

The tactics came to light on Wednesday (Dec 5) from internal Facebook e-mails and other company documents released by a British parliamentary committee that is investigating online misinformation. "So ultimately, I think the objective of platform - even the read side - is to increase sharing back into Facebook".

Mr Zuckerberg and Ms Sandberg are under scrutiny for their handling of the matters; the executives have publicly said they were slow to respond to some of the problems.

Critics have drawn attention to this kind of behavior as being potentially in violation of United States and European antitrust and anti-monopoly laws, as the dominant Facebook platform can arguably be seen blocking competitors attempts to enter its market.

They were reportedly taken using an obscure legal power when the boss of USA software company Six4Three - which is involved in court action against Facebook in the U.S. - came to the United Kingdom on a business trip.

The UK parliament's select media committee published more than 200 pages of internal Facebook emails it has acquired while probing how the giant was being used to manipulate major election results The UK parliament's select media committee published more than 200 pages of internal Facebook emails it has acquired while probing how the giant was being used to manipulate major election results.

One of the most publicised shows how they removed rival Twitter's access so people could not find friends on its Vine video app.

Facebook had recently gone public and was counting on third-party apps such as games to help drive growth.

Facebook, which has described the Six4Three case as baseless, said the released communications are misleading without additional context, but did not elaborate.

Facebook changed it access policy in 2015 to prevent app developers from collecting data from friends of users who downloaded apps. "Like any business, we had many internal conversations about the various ways we could build a sustainable business model for our platform", Facebook said in an emailed statement. The emails show Zuckerberg and other executives scheming to leverage user data to favour companies not considered to be threats and to identify potential acquisitions.

Facebook's director of developer platforms and programs Konstantinos Papamiltiadis told AFP last week that the company "has never sold anyone's data".

Don't we want Facebook to protect our data?

The U.K. committee seized the documents from app developer Six4Three, maker of a now-defunct bikini-picture search app. Six4Three acquired the files as part of a USA lawsuit that accuses Facebook of deceptive, anti-competitive business practices.

The revelation comes from a trove of Facebook emails, presentations, and documents published by UK Parliament as part of its ongoing investigation into privacy and disinformation.

The documents also suggest that Facebook collected user data without those users' knowledge.

On Wednesday, Facebook defended its business practices in a blog post.

"We've prepared reactive PR", Osofsky wrote, to which Zuckerberg replied, "Yup, go for it". "We blocked a lot of sketchy apps".

But charging had led the best games to abandon Facebook's services, Lessin said, and he was "not proud" of those that remained. That proposal was never implemented, according to Facebook. Though the tools and data remained free, they became less valuable to many app makers. "However, that may be good for the world but it's not good for us unless people also share back to Facebook and that content increases the value of our network".

Related news