Oscar now Atlantic hurricane, no threat to land

Oscar now Atlantic hurricane, no threat to land

Oscar now Atlantic hurricane, no threat to land

Tropical Storm Oscar has formed in the Atlantic Ocean, but does not pose a threat to land. As of 10 p.m., the National Hurricane Center said Oscar was centered some 660 miles southeast of Bermuda and 645 miles northeast of the northern Leeward Islands and moving west at 16 mph.

Oscar is the eighth hurricane of the six-month Atlantic hurricane season that ends November 30. Oscar could then become a hurricane by Monday night or Tuesday.

The Atlantic hurricane season typically peaks in September and October, but major storms do sometimes form in November. If Oscar reaches 74 miles per hour, it will designated as a hurricane.

The system ended up becoming a category 1 hurricane three days later and eventually produced wild autumn weather, including some flooding, in Ireland and Wales, though it didn't directly affect any landmass. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles from the center. "After that time, the system is forecast to turn westward well to the north or northeast of the Lesser Antilles through early next week". Additional strengthening is possible as well due to the warm waters and low wind shear directly above the storm.

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