NASA captures incredible image of near-perfect rectangle iceberg off Antarctic Peninsula

NASA captures incredible image of near-perfect rectangle iceberg off Antarctic Peninsula

NASA captures incredible image of near-perfect rectangle iceberg off Antarctic Peninsula

NASA's ongoing, decades-long survey of polar ice has yielded some truly incredible photographs over the years, but one recent still captured what appears to be a perfectly, nearly impossibly rectangular iceberg.

NASA's Operation IceBridge, which monitors polar ice using plane surveys, has been going on for a decade.

It even has a name: A tabular iceberg, a type of iceberg both broad and flat.

A big crack in Antarctica's crumbling Larsen C ice shelf caused the huge iceberg to break free in July 2017.

An ice shelf is a large, floating chunk of ice attached to a nearby land mass, and Larsen C is just the latest on the frontline.

For years, Antarctic scientists have documented the curiously straight-edged icebergs floating in the water after snapping off from ice shelves - the ends of massive glaciers that float over the ocean.

"We get two types of icebergs".

The striking iceberg isn't the only perfectly shaped formation scientists came across on their flight over the Atlantic last week, with NASA also sharing images online of a triangular berg found in the Weddell Sea.

It's ideal edges are formed by breaking off ice shelfs with clear precision but are rarely kept in that state for very long.

"So, here's the deal", Brunt told Live Science.

Explaining how the iceberg formed, she said: "We get two types of icebergs: We get the type that everyone can envision in their head that sank the Titanic, and they look like prisms or triangles at the surface and you know they have a insane subsurface".

"How the berg is formed is speculative given the collisions are not known in much detail, nor is the physical state of the iceberg - many rifts are visible in satellite imagery, many are not yet visible but are forming as the berg responds to its journey", says Shuman. They're often rectangular and geometric as a result, she added. This iceberg looks pretty fresh, she said.

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