Google shutting down social network Google+ after security bug disclosed

Google shutting down social network Google+ after security bug disclosed

Google shutting down social network Google+ after security bug disclosed

In a world where there seems to be a new social network data breach every couple of weeks, according to a Wall Street Journal report, a software glitch within Google+ potentially gave third-party developers access to hundreds of thousands of user's private data.

The company says it didn't find any evidence that any of the affected personal information was misused.

In a blog post, the company admitted Google+ had failed to achieve "broad consumer or developer adoption" since it launched as a would-be Facebook rival in 2011.

"Going forward, consumers will get more fine-grained control over what account data they choose to share with each app", Google said.

But it's not doing so exclusively out of concern for users' privacy: Smith admitted the network is not a success, saying "The consumer version of Google+ now has low usage and engagement: 90 percent of Google+ user sessions are less than five seconds". Google+ will be gradually discontinued over the next ten months, with the service being scheduled to completely shut down in late August of 2019.

Google is shutting down its much-maligned social network, Google+, after user data was exposed.

Further speaking on the issue, Google has said that they have no evidence that any outside developer has misused users private data.

In response to this, Google+ will be shutting down for regular users.

"Every year, we send millions of notifications to users about privacy and security bugs and issues", a spokesperson for Google said in a statement provided to CNN Business. "When an app prompts you for access to your Google account data, we always require that you see what data it has asked for, and you must grant it explicit permission", he said.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the report. This time frame is so little that Google could not confirm which users were impacted by the incident.

The bug, discovered in March during an internal company review, could have allowed outside software developers - or people posing as outside developers - to learn the names, email addresses, occupations, genders and ages of Google+ users.

Despite the security gaff, Google officials opted not to disclose the problem at the time over fear of intense criticism akin to what Facebook went through after its privacy problems.

More information will be available over the coming months, including ways that users can download and migrate their data.

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