Surfer dies after contracting deadly brain-eating amoeba

Surfer dies after contracting deadly brain-eating amoeba

Surfer dies after contracting deadly brain-eating amoeba

Fabrizio Stabile, of Ventor, reportedly contracted the amoeba from a wave pool at a surf resort in central Texas.

Stabile returned to New Jersey and began suffering from a headache on September 16, according to the family's GoFundMe page.

Known as "Fab", Stabile was born in Bloomsberg, Pennsylvania, and loved spending time outdoors, according to his obituary in the Press of Atlantic City. It can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM).

The park will stay closed until results come back from the investigation.

On Thursday, he tested positive for Naegleria fowleri - an infection that has only affected 34 people between 2008 to 2017, according to the CDC.

"Our hearts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the New Jersey surf community during this hard time", Mr Parsons said.

It remains unclear when exactly Stabile visited the park, but infection symptoms from the parasite typically flare up between one and nine days after contact.

Officials with the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention are testing the Waco surf resort's water for Naegleria fowleri, KBTX reported. A small CDC team collected samples for Naegleria fowleri testing and will be working with the health department on recommendations to provide the facility on how to reduce potential exposures. The CDC notes that, on average, death occurs within one to 18 days of initial symptoms.

Naegleria fowleri is commonly referred to as "brain-eating amoeba" is a free-living microscopic amoeba that is commonly found in warm freshwater, such as lakes, rivers and hot springs.

In the wake of Stabile's death, his family has created The Fabrizio Stabile Foundation for Naegleria Fowleri Awareness to educate others about the rare and preventable infection. "By the time Fabrizio was diagnosed, it was too late to administer the drug that had previously been provided to three of the only five known survivors in North America".

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