NJ surfer dies from 'brain eating amoeba' after visiting Texas water park

NJ surfer dies from 'brain eating amoeba' after visiting Texas water park

NJ surfer dies from 'brain eating amoeba' after visiting Texas water park

"BSR Surf Resort operates a state of the art artificial man-made wave".

Tests came back on September 20, showing Stabile tested positive for Naegleria fowleri, an amoeba that typically occurs in warm fresh water and that had caused a rare infection.

"With great sadness and heavy hearts, we mourn the loss of a FABulous associate", the shop said on Facebook.

BSR Cable Park closed Friday while the CDC conducted tests for Naegleria fowleri.

The waterpark voluntarily closed Friday as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention test its waters, Waco-McLennan County Public Health District spokesperson Kelly Craine told the Waco Tribune-Herald. "We hope to have results by the end of the week".

"Our hearts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the New Jersey surf community during this hard time", BSR Cable Park owner Stuart E. Parsons Jr. said in a statement to the Waco Tribune-Herald.

"Our hearts and prayers are with his family, friends and the New Jersey surf community during this hard time", Parsons told CBS.

The 29-year-old man died in New Jersey earlier this month after falling ill with Naegleria fowleri.

The CDC says Naegleria fowleri is commonly found in warm freshwater and soil.

It causes the nervous-system infection primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) by traveling up a person's nostrils and into their brain, but can not be transmitted if a person swallows water contaminated with the bug.

PAM is nearly always fatal. According to the CDC's website, symptoms usually start one to nine days after swimming, and those infected typically die one to 18 days after the symptoms begin to show. Infections usually occur when it is hot for prolonged periods of time, which results in higher water temperatures and lower water levels.

Naegleria Fowleri is especially risky, proving fatal 97 percent of the time according to the CDC. Most infections occur from exposure to contaminated recreational water.

Related news