CDC investigating 'brain eating amoeba' at surf resort in Waco

CDC investigating 'brain eating amoeba' at surf resort in Waco

CDC investigating 'brain eating amoeba' at surf resort in Waco

Frabrizio Stabile, of Ventor, New Jersey, had swam in the wave pool at BSR Cable Park's Surf Resort prior to testing positive for Naegleria fowleri, an amoeba that usually occurs in warm freshwater.

Stabile was remembered as an avid outdoors lover who loved to surf and snowboard.

The owner of BSR Cable Park, Stuart E. Parsons Jr., said the park will continue to comply with requests related to the investigation of Stabile's death.

It remains unclear when exactly Stabile visited the park, but infection symptoms from the parasite typically flare up between one and nine days after contact.

The disease, according to the CDC, is nearly always fatal, with only four people out of 143 cases have survived the infection. From the nose, it can travel to the brain and cause primary amebic meningoencephalitis, or PAM, the CDC noted. In rare cases, the amoeba has been found in inadequately chlorinated swimming pools and even tap water.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) is now investigating the case and BSR has voluntarily ceased operation until conclusive results are available.

"BSR Surf Resort operates a state of the art artificial man-made wave", he said.

The surf resort has been closed pending the test results from the CDC, he said.

In a statement it said: "CDC is testing water samples for Naegleria fowleri and will be working with the health department on recommendations to provide the facility on how to reduce potential exposures".

In the wake of Stabile's death his family founded the Fabrizio Stabile Foundation for Naegleria Fowleri Awareness - which has raised more than $22,000 in less than a week via a GoFundMe page. Swallowing water contaminated by the amoeba can not cause the infection.

NJ.com reported that by the time he was diagnosed, it was "too late to administer the drug that has been given to three of the only five survivors in North America". Normally, people are infected when contaminated water enters through their nose, according to the agency.

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