Massive spiderweb blankets Greek beach for spider mating 'party'

Massive spiderweb blankets Greek beach for spider mating 'party'

Massive spiderweb blankets Greek beach for spider mating 'party'

Greek local and photographer Giannis Giannakopoulos captured stunning photographs and a video of the webs.

Warm weather and a large number of mosquitos are thought to be to blame for the booming population of the arachnids, which have swarmed the island to mate.

A Western Greek beach has almost been taken over with more than 900 feet of spider webs.

The giant webs are spun by a very small spider of the Tetragnatha genus ― it's just 0.7 inches long, according to Inside Edition.

A Greek beach has been turned into an arachnophobe's worst nightmare, as hoards of spiders weave thousands of cobwebs all along the shoreline.

Molecular Biologist Maria Chatzaki spoke with Sunday Express and said: "These spiders are not unsafe for humans and will not cause any damage to the area's flora".

"It's as if the spiders are taking advantage of these conditions and are having a kind of a party", Chatzaki said, according to a translation by the BBC.

Behind the phenomenon, Pergantis said, are the spiders' favorite snacks: gnats.

Local Giannis Giannakopoulos shared pictures Monday of what he described as a "strange and unprecedented spectacle" on his Facebook page, garnering dozens of shares.

There are times when one might wonder what the hell was nature up to when they invented the scary nope creatures we know today as spiders. Plus, they probably won't stick around too long.

Sadly, the eight-legged architects will soon die off, leaving the web to degrade naturally.

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