Microsoft quietly stops interfering with Chrome and Firefox installations on Windows 10

Microsoft quietly stops interfering with Chrome and Firefox installations on Windows 10

Microsoft quietly stops interfering with Chrome and Firefox installations on Windows 10

This boneheaded move, created to get people to try Edge for more than just downloading another browser, was rightly met with fury here and across the internet, and Microsoft has now pulled the "advert", claiming it was just a test. In the latest Insider build (1809) of the OS, Microsoft has started interrupting installations of the Firefox and Chrome web browsers. How do you get those people to give Edge a chance? However, now Microsoft has been spotted testing a warning that suggests users utilise Microsoft Edge instead, instead of installing Chrome or Firefox. Google pushes Chrome on all of its properties when users use different browsers to connect to them, and Microsoft too displayed notifications on the Windows 10 platform to users who used other browsers that Edge was more secure or power friendly.

You already have Microsoft Edge - the safer, faster browser for Windows 10.
So Microsoft trying to force users to use Edge here really doesn't do anything - it's just another irritating dialog you have to ignore in order to not use Edge, basically. Microsoft has also added an option "Don't want to be warned in the future" which takes the users to Settings and allows them to disable app recommendations. Try double-clicking your download.

In my opinion, the operating system you choose to run should remain independent of the software you choose to install, but Microsoft clearly disagrees with that view based on a new tweak to Windows 10.

"Dropbox or Google Drive are outdated thanks to the great OneDrive feature in Windows 10". By Windows blocking the actual installation of a program, even temporarily, Microsoft is purposely getting in the way of what a user wants, which is far more annoying and unwanted. Some analysts say Edge's share has fallen over the a year ago, so maybe Microsoft needs all the help it can get. This is an escalation in the war between Edge, Chrome, and Firefox. People use Windows in the real world to run a variety of applications, not just connect to Microsoft services in half-baked "Universal" apps, "Metro" apps, or whatever we're calling them now. So maybe you should make Edge a better browser instead of thinking up new ways to shove it in our faces.

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