Donald Trump Cancels Pay Raises For Federal Employees

Donald Trump Cancels Pay Raises For Federal Employees

Donald Trump Cancels Pay Raises For Federal Employees

It is worth noting that the Senate spending plan did receive some opposition from the White House, as Trump has recommended freezing federal salary despite increasing pay by 1.4 percent previous year, according to Washington's Top News.

"We must maintain efforts to put our Nation on a fiscally sustainable course, and Federal agency budgets can not sustain such increases", the President wrote.

The federal deficit has exploded under Trump, with the advent of the GOP tax law that is projected to cost $1.9 trillion over the course of a decade, as well as a bipartisan spending deal that increased discretionary spending by almost $300 billion in 2018 and 2019.

Trump said he was nixing a 2.1 percent across-the-board raise for most workers as well as separate locality pay increases averaging 25.7 percent. That's wrong - and it disrespects the important work done throughout our country by federal workers. Federal workers have been hit with the negative news while troops are experiencing the opposite since they will get a 2.6 per cent increase next year. Mark Warner, D-Va., called it "the latest attack in the Trump Administration's war on federal employees".

Trump frequently trumpets the military pay raise while listing his administration's accomplishments.

The move drew a quick response from D.C. -area members and is nearly certain to draw howls from the Senate, which included a 1.9 percent pay raise in its Financial Services spending bill.

"Trump has delivered yet another slap in the face to American workers", said Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez.

However, it notes that because of changes in law over the past year, the economy is expected to grow faster than it had projected last June, causing the CBO to decrease its estimate for the cumulative deficit by $1 trillion over the next decade.

Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Maryland Democrat representing many federal workers living in the D.C. area, quickly criticized the move.

An across-the-board 2.1% pay increase for federal workers was slated to take effect in January. To help offset the pay freeze, the administration has pushed for a $1 billion workforce fund for incentive-based pay, recruiting and retaining employees.

Trump said the pay raises would cost the federal government $25 billion, and canceling the raises will "put our nation on a fiscally sustainable course". "Accordingly, I have determined that it is appropriate to exercise my authority to set alternative across-the-board and locality pay adjustments for 2019".

Trump is not anxious about the effect of freezing federal pay on the government's ability to be successful in "recruiting, retaining and rewarding high-performing Federal employees and those with critical skill sets".

J. David Cox, president of AFGE, said the Senate bill "would help prevent workers from falling further behind next year and help federal agencies recruit and retain the high-caliber workforce that the public expects and deserves".

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