More than 100 shooting stars expected in weekend’s Perseid meteor shower peak

More than 100 shooting stars expected in weekend’s Perseid meteor shower peak

More than 100 shooting stars expected in weekend’s Perseid meteor shower peak

The shower runs from July 17 to August 24, however, it peaks from 4 pm on August 12 until 4 am on August 13 Eastern Daylight Time.

"This year, we'll be lucky the moon won't be shining most of the night", Bjerke said.

As he was executed on August 10, many Catholics associate the Perseid meteor shower with St Lawrence, and dub the shooting stars as the "tears of St Lawrence" as they occur at the same time each year.

The shower is the result of Earth encountering the gritty debris of Comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Although the peak occurs this weekend, the Perseids are visible for several nights after that.

For casual and die-hard astronomers alike, the middle of August means the return of the Perseid meteor shower.

"All you've got to do is go outside, find a nice dark spot, lie flat on your back and look up", Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environments Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, told Live Science previously.

"So every year when the Earth orbits the sun and passes through that debris field you get this stream of particles that pass into the atmosphere and gives you this meteor shower", Twarog said.

The emirate's leading archaeological and eco-tourism project, developed by the Sharjah Investment and Development Authority (Shurooq) and located in the historic dunes of Mleiha, 40 minutes away from Sharjah city lights.

But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon. The meteor shower will peak overnight into Monday, with 70 meteors visible each hour, according to the Royal Astronomical Society. You may have a slightly better chance if you face northeast. If you're serious about your stargazing, allow ample time for this beforehand.

As meteors enter the earth's atmosphere they leave streaks of light in the sky, which some people call shooting stars.

Meteor showers are typically visible with the naked eye, so no special equipment is needed, but those in rural areas with minimal light pollution will have a clearer view. Here are the peak times to see the meteor shower in your area.

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