Don't miss the meteor shower

But the shooting stars have only just began to build in intensity and will soon burst into the night skies in full glory between the night of Sunday, August 12, and the morning of Monday, August 13. The best time to view is after midnight each night.

That's when the peak will start to build as Earth drifts through the most dense part of a cloud of cosmic debris left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle, which passes by our planet and the sun once every 133 years.

This year's Perseid meteor shower will be highly visible both Saturday and Sunday night, giving watchers ample opportunity to spot plenty of shooting stars.

The Perseids are perhaps the most beloved of all meteor showers due to their predictability. Unfortunately, there's always the chance that bad weather like fog or rain will create unfavorable viewing conditions. And if you want to know how to pronounce "Perseid" correctly, it sounds a little like "Purse-y-id", here's a video from NASA to help. Stargazers can expect to see 150-200 meteors an hour, complete with streaks and fireballs.

The best nights to follow the fall of such meteors will be 11th, 12th and 13th of August 2018.

Meteor showers are typically visible with the naked eye, and so no special equipment is needed (Photo: Shutterstock)How regular will the meteors be? In those cases they can actually predict that when the Earth passes through the orbital path of the comet there will be a higher than average debris field.

Why does a meteor shower occur?

Once they show up in the sky, the Perseids appear to radiate from the Constellation Perseus which has earned them their namesake.

The best time to see those meteors is at around 11 p.m. ET until dawn the next morning.

But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon. The moon will also not be an issue this year with only a crescent moon appearing.

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