USA hits Russian Federation with sanctions over nerve agent attack

USA hits Russian Federation with sanctions over nerve agent attack

USA hits Russian Federation with sanctions over nerve agent attack

The 1991 Chemical and Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act "requires the president to make a determination with respect to whether a country has used chemical or biological weapons in violation of worldwide law or has used lethal chemical or biological weapons against its own nationals, " the State Department said.

Sergei and Yulia Skripal were found unconscious on a bench in Salisbury, England, on March 4, having been poisoned by Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

A terse release from the State Department said that the United States had determined Russian responsibility for the attack in Salisbury, England - a British conclusion the administration had already accepted - under a 1991 USA law on biological and chemical weapons use that requires the president to impose sanctions.

The sanctions would be structured in two tranches, with the biggest impact from the initial sanctions expected to come from a ban on granting licenses to export sensitive national security goods to Russia, NBC reported, quoting a senior State Department official.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has signed off a new round of sanctions over the violation of global law.

The United States will impose sanctions on Russia for its use of a nerve agent in an attempt to kill a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain.

Also in March, Washington ordered the expulsion of 60 Russian diplomats, and the closure of Russia's consulate general in Seattle.

Police think the novichok was sprayed or smeared on their front doorknob with a perfume bottle.

Sanctions waivers are in place for certain key sectors, including space flight activities and commercial aviation safety, the official said.

The biggest impact from the initial sanctions are expected to come from a ban on granting licenses to export sensitive national security goods to Russian Federation, the report said.

Charlie Rowley, 45, was released from a hospital last month, but his partner, Dawn Sturgess, 44, died after exposure.

Relations between Russia and the West hit a new low, and the USA was among United Kingdom allies that expelled Russian diplomats.

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