Hurricane, tropical storm are swirling off western Mexico

Hurricane, tropical storm are swirling off western Mexico

Hurricane, tropical storm are swirling off western Mexico

Hurricane Hector is tracking for a close call with Hawaii's Big Island, parts of which are still coping with destruction from the ongoing eruption of the Kilauea volcano. As of 11 a.m., the storm had sustained winds of 40 miles per hour with a northerly movement at 16 miles per hour.

The conditions needed to stir up hurricanes are lacking, noted Phil Klotzbach and Michael Bell of Colorado State University's Tropical Meteorology Project.

Swells from Hector will produce surf heights from 12 to 15 feet on east-facing shores mainly for the Puna and Kau districts of the Big Island Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service. It was no longer expected to grow into a major hurricane. Subtropical storms usually have winds that are spread out farther from the center, and they are often asymmetric. The National Hurricane Center said it was likely to peak as a Category 3 hurricane before starting to weaken and turn out to sea as it passes west of the Baja California Peninsula late in the week.

More than two months into the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, the forecasters' predictions of a quiet year appear to be accurate.

A tropical storm warning has been posted for the Big Island of Hawaii, where tropical-storm-force winds (39-plus mph) are expected Wednesday, especially downslope from mountains, across elevated terrain, over headlands and through gaps. It poses no threat to land.

The risk of a hurricane striking the United States during the remainder of the summer is lower than average, experts said in an updated seasonal forecast released Thursday.

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