USA threatened nations over breastfeeding resolution

USA threatened nations over breastfeeding resolution

USA threatened nations over breastfeeding resolution

According to the Times report on Sunday based on interviews with dozens of meeting participants, U.S. negotiations in Geneva objected to the resolution encouraging breastfeeding around the world and allegedly resorted to intimidation tactics to bully other countries into dropping it.

Media are reporting on how the USA threatened Ecuador with trade sanctions if it did not back off a resolution meant to promote breastfeeding around the world at a Geneva convention this spring for the United Nations' World Health Assembly.

Mr. Trump said the country "strongly supports" breastfeeding, but the issue the US representatives had was with denying access to formula. "Many women need this option because of malnutrition and poverty".

The president's tweet was a direct response to an article published by The New York Times on Sunday, titled "U.S. Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution Stuns World Health Officials." .

"What happened was tantamount to blackmail, with the US holding the world hostage and trying to overturn almost 40 years of consensus on best way to protect infant and young child health", The New York Times quoted her as saying. The Department of Health and Human Services, however, defended its decision to reword the resolution.

"The resolution as originally drafted placed unnecessary hurdles for mothers seeking to provide nutrition to their children", an HHS spokesman said in the email to the Times.

"Many women are not able to breastfeed for a variety of reasons, these women should not be stigmatised; they should be equally supported with information and access to alternatives for the health of themselves and their babies".

A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services, the lead agency in negotiations on the resolution, defended the US opposition to the measure, saying that it would impede women's access to vital baby formula when breastfeeding is not an option.

Brooke Singman is a Politics Reporter for Fox News. Infant formula companies "use aggressive, clandestine and often illegal methods to target mothers in the poorest parts of the world to encourage them to choose powdered milk over breastfeeding", the report said.

American officials sought to water down the resolution....

The State Department declined the Times' request to comment and said it could not discuss private diplomatic conversations.

The Ecuadorian delegates acquiesced, and health advocates struggled to find another sponsor for the resolution.

Which of course was not really what the debate was about - since formula is perfectly acceptable and mothers should indeed be able to make their own choice - but rather putting pen to paper on the scientifically-backed conclusion that breastmilk is more beneficial than formula. Overall, global sales are expected to rise by 4 per cent in 2018, according to Euromonitor, with most of that growth occurring in developing nations.

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