Forecasters tracking disturbed weather in Caribbean, little threat to us

Forecasters tracking disturbed weather in Caribbean, little threat to us

Forecasters tracking disturbed weather in Caribbean, little threat to us

Hurricane "Bud" is the 2nd tropical storm in the Eastern Pacific.

While the drought-stricken areas in the southwestern United States could benefit from the moisture of this storm, the region could also experience flash flooding if rain develops too quickly.

Aletta is centered just over 500 miles south-southwest of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula.

As of 5 p.m. ET, Bud had winds of 75 miles per hour and was moving to the northwest at 9 miles per hour. Earlier Tuesday, it briefly strengthened to a Category 4 hurricane.

The hurricane center said the storm was about 230 miles southwest of Cabo Corrientes, near Puerto Vallarta.

The hurricane will churn up the ocean water along the Mexican coast, which could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions, the hurricane center said.

And Bud will probably not be the last hurricane of the season, with AccuWeather meteorologists anticipating the East Pacific basin remaining active as an above-normal number of tropical cyclones remain in the forecast. A tropical storm watch has been posted for portions of Mexico's west coast. It's happened seven other times since 1970, according to NOAA's historical hurricanes database.

The next storm that forms in the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, or the Caribbean Sea will be given the name Beryl.

Though forecasters said that "environmental conditions could became slightly conducive for some development" towards the end of the week, the system is now only at a 10 percent chance of forming into a cyclone in the next two days and 20 percent in the next five days.

As of Monday afternoon the disturbance consisted of an area of rain and storms over the southwestern Caribbean along with a tropical wave over northwest Venezuela.

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