First Vape-Pen Victim: E-Cigarette Explosion Killed Florida Man, Probe Finds

First Vape-Pen Victim: E-Cigarette Explosion Killed Florida Man, Probe Finds

First Vape-Pen Victim: E-Cigarette Explosion Killed Florida Man, Probe Finds

A Florida man has died from what is believed to be the first deadly explosion of a vape pen.

He confirmed that the cause of the accidental death was a "projectile wound to the head", and that D'Elia had suffered burns on about 80 per cent of his body.

Tallmadge D'Elia was found by firefighters in the burning bedroom of his family home on May 5.

The man was killed when his vaping device created a "projectile wound" in his head, penetrating his skull, and getting lodged in his brain.

Nearly 80 percent of Tallmadge's body had thermal damaged, the most affected parts being his head, chest, and back.

Tampa TV station WFTS reported that a representative from Smok-E Mountain said the problem was likely an issue pertaining to the device's atomizer or battery, and not the device itself.

Meanwhile, the US Fire Administration released a report on e-cigarette explosions from 2009 to 2016.

The death is thought to be the first in the USA directly related to the use of one of the popular smoking devices. The mod pen, distributed by Smok-E Mountain, is manufactured in the Philippines. Tallmadge "Wake" D'Elia's official cause of death, which is the first e-cigarette fatality in the US, was listed as "projectile wound of the head" and ruled accidental.

The report blames the incidents on lithium-ion batteries in the products. Authorities ruled the man's death an accident. While the jury is still out on that, with the debate still going on strong, what's hard to deny is that these devices are essentially battery packs that have the potential to explode, as we have seen in the past.

Use vape pens with safety features. Since most e-cigarettes use lithium batteries, there is commonly known high risks associated with improper use of the electronics.

The health effects related to the ingestion of e-cigarette vapor are still being studied by government agencies. The company also said they have had issues of people cloning the battery in the past, making it less safe.

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