Australian blood donor James Harrison saving 2 millions peoples

Australian blood donor James Harrison saving 2 millions peoples

Australian blood donor James Harrison saving 2 millions peoples

James Harrison, dubbed the "man with the golden arm", has provided 1,117 bags of vital blood which contain an antibody in his plasma, and stops babies dying from Rhesus disease, a form of severe anaemia. Regardless of what the reason is, the publication stressed that Harrison always remained humble during each succeeding blood donation he made.

James Harrison has donated his blood, almost every week, since the past 60 years. That could be deadly for the baby.

According to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, Harrison has made almost 1,100 blood donations throughout his lifetime and has saved the lives of over 2.4 million Australian babies.

The affectionate nickname comes from homage to the Australian senior's astonishing blood donor track record and the game-changing effect that his donations have had on his country. That's a unsafe condition that develops when a woman has rhesus-negative blood (RhD negative) and has a baby in her womb with RhD positive blood. "The end of a long run", he said as he was making his last blood donation at the Town Hall Donor Centre.

When the mother's Rh- blood mixes with Rh+ blood, the mother's blood starts to develop an immunity to the Rh+ blood cells.

The mother must have also been previously sensitised to RhD-positive blood.

During pregnancy, if a mother has Rh- blood and her fetus has Rh+ blood, it can cause problems if their blood starts to mix. The medicine is given to mothers whose blood is at risk of attacking their unborn babies.

According to the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, he has helped saved the lives of more than 2.4 million Australian babies.

"Women were having numerous miscarriages, and babies were being born with brain damage."

Harrison received the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1999 for his continuous support of the Blood Service and Anti-D program.

Her blood can then cross the placenta and attack the baby's blood cells, thus causing the baby to have a shortage of blood.

It is uncommon these days because it can usually be prevented using injections of anti-D immunoglobulin. "It's one of my talents, probably my only talent, is that I can be a blood donor". On Friday, the 81-year-old Harrison officially "retired" as a blood donor, having made his final donation after reaching the maximum age allowed under Australian law.

"I'd keep on going if they'd let me", he told the Herald.

Related news