Green Berets secretly helping Saudis destroy Houthi sites at Yemen border

Green Berets secretly helping Saudis destroy Houthi sites at Yemen border

Green Berets secretly helping Saudis destroy Houthi sites at Yemen border

Mohammad Bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's crown prince and principle architect of the Yemen war, called on the United States to support the fight.

However Virginia Senator Tim Kaine and member of the Armed Services Committee criticised the action, saying: "The mission is a purposeful blurring of lines between train and equip missions and combat".

Since then, a Saudi-led coalition has been locked in conflict with the Houthis, as they work to reinstate President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Our troops continue to see their involvement increase in the Saudi-led war against the Houthis.

But opponents of USA anti-Houthi operations in Yemen contend that The New York Times revelations indicate that the Trump administration was less than forthcoming in the debate leading up to the Senate's tabling of the Sanders-Lee joint resolution in March.

Houthis have been controlling much of Yemen's north by force, including the capital Sanaa since 2014.

Saudi air defenses shot down on Sunday two ballistic missiles fired by the Iran-backed Houthi militias towards the Kingdom, reported the Saudi Press Agency.

On April 17, Robert S. Karem, assistant secretary of defense for global security affairs, told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that the United States had about 50 military personnel in Saudi Arabia, "largely helping on the ballistic missile threat".

A Yemeni government source told Al-Arabiya satellite channel that Mohsen Al Karbi was trying to exit Yemen at a border crossing in Al-Mahra province on his way to Omani territories.

Together the porous border, the Americans work with attacking planes that could gather electronic signals to monitor the Houthi weapons and their own launch websites, according to the officials, and all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity as they weren't licensed to go over the mission openly.

The Pentagon's "limited non-combat support, such as intelligence sharing, focuses on assisting our partners in securing their borders from cross-border attacks from the Houthis", military spokesman Major Adrian Rankine-Galloway said.

Robert Karem, assistant secretary of defense for international-security affairs, told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 17 that the United States had about 50 military personnel in Saudi Arabia, "largely helping on the ballistic-missile threat".

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