Teach religion in public schools to combat discrimination and violence, say panellists

Teach religion in public schools to combat discrimination and violence, say panellists

Teach religion in public schools to combat discrimination and violence, say panellists

The Millcreek School District in Erie chose to give out baseball bats to its faculty members, Erie News Now reported. The district ordered about 600 bats at a cost of about $1,800.

Detail of bats during the game between the Boston Red Sox and the Toronto Blue Jays at Skydome on May 16, 2004 in Toronto, Canada.

Hall told the Erie Times-News that the mini baseball bats were handed out to the approximately 500 teachers employed by the district's elementary, middle and high school teachers during a training session on how to respond to school shootings.

"We passed them out, with the goal being we wanted every room to have one of these", said Hall.

A rural school district in Pennsylvania also grabbed headlines last month for saying it would give buckets of river rocks to teachers to potentially ward off school shooters.

The bats will be locked up in each classroom and will be kept in offices of the district's 10 schools.

A letter from Utica National Insurance was read during a Board of Education meeting Tuesday ay which insurance agent Louis Casciaro said the district was being singled out for the company's annual school safety excellence award.

Other measures include a implementing "run, hide, fight" approach for students and staff, building a concrete barrier to existing walkways at the high school, constructing secured entrances, purchasing "Sop the Bleed" kits for all classrooms and giving police access to all security camera systems and the district's emergency radio frequency.

President Donald Trump has suggested arming teachers with guns to protect schools in the wake of a spate of deadly shootings. In a statement released April 3, Hall told parents that the school district has revised a "TROJAN" response procedure that involves running, hiding or fighting against a threat. "We didn't talk about the other options of running or barricading... and how do you defend yourself".

On Monday, Sidney High School hosted a program created to help students see that their fellow students are not as different as they might believe, and that some of the "strangers" in the hallway might be future friends. "It was about 70 percent to 30 percent that people would favor that, but we're not really actively planning that right now".

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