LA Man Charged in Kansas for Fatal Hoax Call

LA Man Charged in Kansas for Fatal Hoax Call

LA Man Charged in Kansas for Fatal Hoax Call

The Los Angeles man arrested in connection to a deadly swatting call in Wichita, Kansas last month has been charged with involuntary manslaughter. But causing a false alarm is not among the "inherently risky felonies" listed under the state's felony-murder statute, so prosecutors sought the manslaughter charge instead, Bennett said during a phone interview.

The involuntary manslaughter charge carries a maximum sentence of 11 years and is a Level 5 felony in Kansas, according to state statutes. His bond is set at $US500,000 ($634,608). Police claim that Finch moved his hands in a suspicious manner.

Tyler Rai Barriss, 25, was charged with involuntary manslaughter and interference with law enforcement, according to court records made public Friday. In that case, the intended victim, Lisa Vannatta, who streams about gaming and technology under the name STPeach, was warned about the possible swatting by a viewer; she then contacted 911 herself to inform the police that it was a hoax.

Calgary police said Tuesday they have charged Tyler Raj Barriss, 25, of Los Angeles, with mischief and fraud charges following the incident on December 22 that saw officers along with police dogs surround the unnamed woman's apartment. The address turned out to be unrelated to anyone involved with the dispute, however, and instead led police to Finch.

"Someone tried to SWAT me and got an innocent man killed, the person said on Twitter according to Rolling Stone". That officer is now on paid administrative leave.

The false call made by Barriss is believed to have been the result of an online dispute between two Call of Duty players.

Bennett could not immediately say why Finch's address became the target of the hoax call.

Responding to a realistic-sounding 911 call, Calgary police believed a man had been shot and two others were being held hostage in the home. Police revealed few other details but said investigators identified a suspect who had made contact online with the woman earlier that day and that she was targeted because of her "online persona".

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