Meltdown, Spectre affect Mac, iOS but there are no known exploits

Meltdown, Spectre affect Mac, iOS but there are no known exploits

Meltdown, Spectre affect Mac, iOS but there are no known exploits

"Analysis of these techniques revealed that while they are extremely hard to exploit, even by an app running locally on a Mac or iOS device, they can be potentially exploited in JavaScript running in a web browser", Apple said.

Apple simply distributed another help archive clarifying that iOS and macOS could be assaulted by the newfound (and exceptionally risky) Meltdown and Specter misuses.

"Since exploiting many of these issues requires a malicious app to be loaded on your Mac or iOS device, we recommend downloading software only from trusted sources such as the App Store", the company adds.

The tech giant said it is working on software updates to fix a pair of vulnerabilities which affect Apple gadgets as well as "all modern processors and affect almost all computing devices and operating systems". "Apple Watch is not affected by Meltdown", the company said.

Yesterday, we told you about a pair of exploits called Meltdown and Spectre. The company says that is "has developed and is rapidly issuing updates for all types of Intel-based computer systems", but it is not clear when - or whether - older devices will be treated to patches.

(Web Desk) - All iPhones, iPads, Macs, Macbooks and other Apple devices are vulnerable to hacking after the revelation of major Intel bug, recent report revealed.

Apple's statement comes just two days after it was reported on Wednesday that all Intel chips produced over the last decade feature a design flaw that could put all Windows, Linux and macOS kernels at risk by essentially allowing commonly used programs to read or discern the contents and layout of a computer's protected kernel memory areas. "Apple will release an update for Safari on macOS and iOS in the coming days to mitigate these exploit techniques". Apple has already released mitigations in iOS 11.2, macOS 10.13.2, and tvOS 11.2 to help defend against Meltdown.

Even so, as Devin Coldewey reports for Techcrunch: "If you're wondering why people keep saying, "mitigate" instead of "fix" or "counteract" or something, it's because Meltdown and Spectre take advantage of computing practices so basic that avoiding them is extremely hard and complex". In addition, many operating system vendors, public cloud service providers, device manufacturers and others have indicated that they have already updated their products and services.

Apple's Spectre fix is still to come, though those vulnerabilities are harder to exploit, according to researchers.

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