Automation, robots and artificial intelligence will bring a bigger shift than industrialisation

Automation, robots and artificial intelligence will bring a bigger shift than industrialisation

Automation, robots and artificial intelligence will bring a bigger shift than industrialisation

Advances in technology have always forced workers to shift with the changing times. These numbers depend, of course, on how fast automation occurs.

As many as 800 million workers worldwide may lose their jobs to robots and automation by 2030, equivalent to over a fifth of the global workforce today, a new report covering 46 nations and over 800 occupations by the research arm of McKinsey & Co projects. Of those displaced workers, up to 375 million people will need to learn a brand new skill set and completely switch careers. Also at greater risk, the report adds, is India, the United States and Japan.

In the US, it seems it's the middle has a higher value of fear, with office commissioners and construction equipment operators among those who may lose their jobs to technology or see their wages go lower to keep them competitive with robots and automated systems.

"Predictions that robots are going to take our jobs are overstated".

"The question is not so much whether there will be enough work to go around in the future, but how individuals, sectors, and entire countries will navigate the complicated workforce transitions that automation will entail in the years ahead", said Susan Lund, a partner at the McKinsey Global Institute. But the authors argue that in the long term as technology has changed, "it creates a multitude of new jobs, more than offsetting" the number of those lost.

McKinsey says that education should be modernized from "19th century notions of teaching and learning" to incorporate more innovative solutions that create specialized instruction for more students.

According to McKinsey, at least 30% of work in 60% of organisations can be carried out successfully using automated processes - something that will likely revolutionise over half of current jobs once implemented. "We just don't know what the new roles will be yet in the industry".

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