Google launches mobile data saving app Datally for developing countries

Google launches mobile data saving app Datally for developing countries

Google launches mobile data saving app Datally for developing countries

Google is very interested in helping you access the internet, but with limited data inclusions for mobile, sometimes that means restricting apps from getting it, so they launched Datally. With it, users can manually control which apps are allowed access to the connection while operating in the background. Datally helps users review their daily, weekly and monthly data usage reports and help understand their consumption patterns.

It's another example of Google building data-saving tools, particularly for users in emerging markets where the cost of mobile data can take up a larger share of the average income. "We've been testing Datally in the Philippines for the past few months, and people are saving up to 30 percent on their data", Caesar Sengupta, Vice President, Next Billion Users, Google, said in a press note. Starting today, it's available globally and is compatible with devices running Android 5.0 Lollipop and higher. If you're in range of a public network, Datally's Wi-Fi finder will notify you and help you connect. A bubble showing data use appears every time an app is opened.

Now you can better manage the usage of your mobile data.

With Datally, users can efficiently monitor and control their allocated data. There are a number of permissions required to use the app that you'll be asked to turn on, but it finds the data usage for apps you're using and displays it a clean simple interface.

Finding quality public Wi-Fi can be a challenge.

Say, your friend comments on your Facebook post, or likes your Instagram photo, you will instantly get a notification for the same.

While blocking apps from using background data will help you save data, it has some limitations. Now Google assures us that the data is safe but we are not so sure about that.

Not only are these smartphone users constantly thinking about data balances, but they do not understand where their data is going, nor do they feel like they can control allocating data to the apps they really care about.

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