Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook is testing a system that allows users to message themselves their nude photos in an effort to combat so-called revenge porn.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", Grant said.

Back in April, Facebook took steps aimed at combating revenge porn in Canada and the U.S., allowing users to flag an image they suspect was posted without consent.

Facebook is piloting the technology in partnership with the Australian government in order to deter online harassment.

Australia is one of the four countries included in this "industry-first" pilot that relies on "cutting-edge" technology to prevent revenge porn.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Facebook has finally found a way to protect users from having their nudes leaked and disseminated over the social network without their consent, but it's a little unorthodox. The photos are stored only temporarily before being deleted after Facebook has done making a hash of them.

PhotoDNA's "hash" matching technology made it possible to identify known illegal images even if someone had altered them.

"Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed, leaving forensic evidence in memory and potentially on disk", digital forensics expert Lesley Carhart told Motherboard. "It's not trivial to destroy all trace of files, including metadata and thumbnails." she added.

Facebook aims to create a digital signature of the nude images that users submit so that no porn material can ever be submitted in future. There is also no guarantee the next Facebook or Messenger hack won't reveal the nude images itself.

"Someone is apparently trying to sell naked photos of me to my fans", the pop star tweeted Monday. They will then be asked to send the pictures they are concerned about to themselves on Messenger while the e-safety commissioner's office notifies Facebook of their submission. Consensual nude photos. You know what's cooler?

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