Supreme Court rejects Samsung's appeal in Apple patent infringement case

Supreme Court rejects Samsung's appeal in Apple patent infringement case

Supreme Court rejects Samsung's appeal in Apple patent infringement case

The South Korea tech giant appealed, and the case made its way up through the court system.

In the newest instance, Samsung also squabbled that "it should not have been subject to a court order barring future use of Apple's innovations".

In 2014, a California court ordered Samsung to pay almost $120 million in damages for violating two of Apple's patents, including the iPhone's well-known slide-to-unlock feature. However, that ruling was overturned in February 2016 by a panel of judges on the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which hears all patent appeals.

Apple's victory in its slide-to-unlock case was significant, but it is relatively minor compared with the company's other pending lawsuits against Samsung, which originally sought up to $1 billion in damages for supposedly copying parts of the iPhone's design, including its app icon interface layout, rounded corners and black rectangular face.

Apple accused Samsung of infringing these patents in 2011.

The case centered around Apple's familiar slide-to-unlock patent as well as autocorrect and quick links, which turn information such as phone numbers into links. Last year, the high court ruled in favor of Samsung in a legal fight over the similar appearances of the two companies' smartphones.

With that, Samsung took the matter to the Supreme Court. Though a substantial amount, it was way lesser than the $2.19 billion Apple was asking for.

The company also said that even though one of the patent's involved in the case has been invalidated by the courts, "today's decision allows Apple to unjustly profit from this patent, stunts innovation and places competition in the courtroom rather than the marketplace".

Although 120 million Dollars sounds pretty impressive, it is just a fraction of the total USD 2 billion demanded by Apple's lawyers from Samsung for the infringement.

"I would prefer to not keep doing this until I retire", she said at a hearing on October 25.

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