Canadian Government Reports Drone Strikes Plane Flying Over Canadian City

Canadian Government Reports Drone Strikes Plane Flying Over Canadian City

Canadian Government Reports Drone Strikes Plane Flying Over Canadian City

Although the make and model of drone has not yet been identified, DJI, the market leader in consumer drones, told GearBrain it "stands ready to assist Canadian aviation authorities as they investigate a report that a small passenger plane struck a drone while landing in Quebec City".

Garneau issued a written statement earlier Sunday in which he said the incident was the first time a drone has hit a commercial aircraft in Canada. The plane sustained minor damage and landed safely at the airport.

A drone that will detect problems with power lines flies over equipment at a Ameren Electric Company facility in Belleville, Illinois on September 8.

In a statement released three days after the near miss, Transport Minister Marc Garneau said: "On October 12, 2017, a Skyjet flight was struck by a drone while inbound to Jean Lesage International Airport in Québec City". Transport Canada did not say what type of drone hit the plane.

Canadian officials announced Sunday that a personal drone collided with a passenger jet last week, marking the first time that has happened in the nation's history. Airports, helipads and seaplane based in Canada are restricted zones for drone operators without permission from Transport Canada.

The rapidly growing use of drones by consumers around the world has led to an upswing in the number of encounters between the remote-controlled devices and planes.

Despite the incident causing no injuries it is a stark reminder of what could happen if drones are flown too close to airports.

In the first three months of 2017, aircraft in the USA reported more than 400 sightings of drones, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's most-recent drone "sightings" report. Violators of the restrictions could be fined as much as $25,000 on top of serving a prison sentence.

Last year, Dubai's global airport announced trial flights of a drone hunter, which is a remote-controlled aircraft that detects drones that can possibly stray into the airspace of a plane.

The drone was described as "very large, certainly not a toy".

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