Jamal Adams Clarifies Comments on Football Field Being 'Perfect Place to Die'

Jamal Adams Clarifies Comments on Football Field Being 'Perfect Place to Die'

Jamal Adams Clarifies Comments on Football Field Being 'Perfect Place to Die'

Adams, the Jets' first-round rookie safety, said he felt it was important, as did head coach Todd Bowles, that he clarify the statement he made a day earlier at the forum when he said: "Literally, if I had a ideal place to die, I would die on the field". Adams, who never mentioned concussions or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, spoke about how much he and others enjoy the game.

"I don't even know what to say", she said. But unfortunately, they are the wrong kind of headlines and involve something he said off the football field as opposed to something he did on it. This is what I do. "Literally, if I had a ideal place to die, I would die on the field". "But you are saying that, 'Me playing this game is going to have detrimental effects on my body in the long run.' Do I understand the consequences of going out there? I do. But again, it's all about passion and love for the game". Strzelczyk, who was diagnosed with CTE, died in 2004 when he intentionally drove his auto into oncoming traffic on the New York State Thruway.

"I bet my kids would want their father here", McMahon said.

Shortly before he was killed in a 1994 surfing accident, surfer Mark Foo said, "It's not tragic to die doing something you love".

"I can't control what other people, how they viewed it", Adams said of the cheers he received.

"I hope all these young cats that are willing to die for the game of football find a higher goal in life", tweeted Packers tight end Martellus Bennett.

"Honestly, I really did not see it getting that far", Adams said of the firestorm.

On Monday night, the controversy grew when Keana McMahon, the former wife of late Pittsburgh Steelers offensive lineman Justin Strzelczyk, told the New York Daily News she was offended by Adams' comments.

With Commissioner Roger Goodell at his side during a fan forum, Adams, 21, told the crowd, "I'm all about making the game safer, but as a defensive player, I'm not a big fan of it". But I think if he could have seen into the future to his demise, that accident and what his children would go through for the next 13 years of their lives, I don't think he would have wanted that.

But as more and more information comes out about what football does to the human brain, it seems like something has to give.

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