Apple ordered to pay $506 million for A-series processors patent infringement

Apple ordered to pay $506 million for A-series processors patent infringement

Apple ordered to pay $506 million for A-series processors patent infringement

Apple has been ordered to pay $506 million in damages to the patent licensing arm of the University of Wisconsin-Madison over a patent infringement lawsuit. The ruling comes after the case's jury ruled Apple owed $234 million, making the judge's decision almost double that of the jury (via Reuters).

Naturally, Apple is appealing the new ruling.

Apple was originally ordered to pay $1.61 "per infringing unit for accused processors sold through the initial entry of judgment on October 26, 2015", Conley said.

Apple has been found guilty in incorporating the predictor circuit developed by the University of Wisconsin without paying and now they will pay $507m.

A United States judge has ordered Apple to pay more than half a billion dollars to a university after the tech firm failed to abide by an earlier court ruling.

The judge says Apple owes WARF additional damages because it continued to infringe upon its patent until it expired in December 2016. The ruling continues a two-year-old patent-infringement battle, which may not be over. The case was filed by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF). It involves U.S. Patent No. 5,871,752, which was issued in 1998 and describes the use of a predictor circuit that can help a processor run more efficiently by analyzing previous mis-speculations. Part of the reason why this never sat well with Apple is because WARF is a non-practicing entity that goes after companies for infringing its patents.

Interestingly, the University has another lawsuit against Apple that was filed in 2015, which alleges that later iPhone processors are continuing with the violation.

Apple did not respond to a Fortune request for comment on the judge's decision. Apple argued for a fee of 7 cents per device, while WARF initially asked for $400 million and $2.74 per device.

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