Great Red Spot, Spotted! Citizens Create Incredible Images of Jupiter Storm

Great Red Spot, Spotted! Citizens Create Incredible Images of Jupiter Storm

Great Red Spot, Spotted! Citizens Create Incredible Images of Jupiter Storm

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft.

These images were captured by "citizen-scientists" during the flyby, which NASA says was planned.

"For generations people from all over the world and all walks of life have marveled over the Great Red Spot", said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

"Now we are finally going to see what this storm looks like, up close and personal". "That is what I live for".

NASA's Juno spacecraft has been orbiting Jupiter since July 2016, orbiting the massive planet five times so far, and collecting a lot of valuable data in the process. The probe's next close encounter will take place on September 1.

"The more we zoom into the Great Red Spot, the more turbulent it seems to be", said scientist James O'Donoghue of Nasa's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Imagine a storm so vast it could swallow the Earth and so powerful that it has swirled nonstop for 350 years.

Juno's mission is to understand how Jupiter formed and how it influenced the development of the rest of the solar system. This is the first time that JunoCam has been positioned to photograph the Great Red Spot up close.

The 10,000 mile (16,000 km) wide Great Red Spot has been observed since 1830 but is thought to have existed for hundreds of years longer. During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet's cloud tops - as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers).

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