Meals On Wheels see spike in donations

Meals On Wheels see spike in donations

Meals On Wheels see spike in donations

The proposed elimination of the CDBG would take away close to two percent of the Meals on Wheels program's funding in the Valley.

Ebmeier says the Meels on Wheels program serves up so much more than a meal, but also a friendly visit, a wellness check and peace-of-mind for families. "I am so happy and thankful because the food supplies are coming at a great time". Eva Call said that with just $2 per day to spend on food, Meals on Wheels saved her life.

Grove City Meals on Wheels in southwestern Mercer County also said they do not receive government money.

Is it true that Meals on Wheels only receives 3 percent of its funding from the federal government? It's another example of the phenomenon of "rage fundraising", where the anger and concerns of donors to progressive and anti-poverty causes threatened by President Trump's proposed policies and budget have brought about a fundraising boom.

Mulvaney, obviously, wasn't saying that Meals on Wheels doesn't work. A total of $100,650 of that funding went to Meals on Wheels.

Manatee County elected officials will deliver meals to local clients from March 20 to March 24.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, one of President Donald Trump's staunchest supporters, disagreed with cuts outlined in the proposed budget.

"Our funding comes from other entities through federal grants and other areas".

The Older Americans Act is under the Department of Health and Human Services umbrella, while the block grants are part of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. There is now no evidence that any of these programs are being cut or that their budget reductions would affect Meals on Wheels programs.

As it turns out, however, this fake budget-cutting story ended up revealing how programs like Meals on Wheels can survive without federal help. About $600,000 of it comes from the federal government directly or through the state. In one example cited in the Good reporting, San Diego's program relies on federal funding for 35 percent of its budget, although its executive director told Good that "until we know what the cuts are going to be, I couldn't give you a number". Clearly, individuals are ready, willing and eager to support this program once they perceive a need.

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