Papua New Guinea earthquake causes small tsunami, no damage

Papua New Guinea earthquake causes small tsunami, no damage

Papua New Guinea earthquake causes small tsunami, no damage

The quake has resulted in New Zealand being put back on red alert for another possible Tsunami.

New Zealand's Ministry of Civil Defence briefly issued a tsunami warning for all of the country's coast but cancelled the alert after analysing additional data.

People living along Papua New Guinea's coastline fled to higher ground on Saturday after a 7.9 magnitude natural disaster struck east of the Pacific nation, triggering a tsunami warning for parts of its archipelago.

The powerful quake struck just after 11:51pm on Saturday (NZT) at a depth of 103.2km, and prompted a tsunami warning across the Pacific.

The PTWC said tsunami waves were possible in the next three hours along some coasts of not only Papua New Guinea but also Indonesia, the Solomon Islands, Pohnpei, Chuuk, Nauru, Kosrae and Vanuatu. Authorities said the extent of damage was not immediately known.

"Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are vulnerable to quake shaking.some casualties and damage are possible", the USGS said on its website as it issued a yellow alert for shaking-related fatalities and losses.

The USGS initially said the quake's magnitude was 8.0, but later downgraded the strength.

The Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology says there is no tsunami threat to the Australian mainland, islands or territories.

Residents report feeling shaking for more than four minutes near the epicentre on the island of New Ireland, around 46km east of Taron.

Quakes are common in Papua New Guinea, which sits on the Pacific's Ring of Fire, a hotspot for seismic activity due to friction between tectonic plates.

Related news