FDA Grants Biogen's Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Fast-Track Status

FDA Grants Biogen's Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Fast-Track Status

FDA Grants Biogen's Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Fast-Track Status

A drug that destroys the characteristic protein plaques that build up in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's is showing "tantalising" promise, scientists say.

But finally, during a study on this disease done by the teams from Victoria University of Wellington and University of Liverpool, the researchers have discovered a new drug that can prevent Alzheimer in its early stage.

Among all the medical researchers held in last 25 years, this is one of the most excellent studies and the outcomes are actually advantageous for the medical industry.

Biogen is a biopharmaceutical company based in Cambridge, MA. These patients did not worsen at all after six months of treatment.

British people in the early stages of the condition are being signed up for a large-scale clinical trial of the monthly injection, which appears to break up the poisonous lumps that form in the brains of sufferers.

Aducanumab is now being investigated in the ongoing PRIME study, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose Phase 1b trial evaluating the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and clinical effects of aducanumab in patients with prodromal or mild AD.

Using blood collected from elderly persons aged up to one hundred and demonstrating no cognitive impairment, the researchers isolated precisely those immune cells whose antibodies are able to identify toxic beta-amyloid plaques but not the amyloid precursor protein that is present throughout the human body and that presumably plays an important role in the growth of nerve cells.

Image: Biogen's investigational Alzheimer's disease treatment aducanumab granted FDA fast track designation.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, accompanied by synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

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